Why Wireless Soundbars are the future of Home Audio Systems

While for many people for whom home theater seem like a dream, a soundbar could prove to be a blessing. In fact, it is the best compromise between wanting quality audio output and at the same time not wanting a home theater.

Nowadays, many trendy soundbars are dominating the market. Out of many, a diversified soundbar that comes with a wireless subwoofer is at its peak & considered as the best soundbar by many consumers. The wireless subwoofer can be controlled via Bluetooth or the remote control that comes along with it. Here is a great option to consider for your home based audio system.

Best Soundbar with Wireless Subwoofer

best soundbars

VIZIO SB4051-CO 40-Inch 5.1 Sound Bar System with Wireless Subwoofer

The VIZIO SB4051-C0 comes with a wireless subwoofer and boasts rear satellite speakers that make it stand out from other soundbars in the market. It’s a nice looking soundbar set with a remote control used to operate its wireless subwoofer.

Though it’s quite a big set, still its look nice and sleek resting on the ground in front of your television or mounted on the wall.

The subwoofer that comes along could be controlled by connecting through Bluetooth or the remote control.

Features

  • Surround Sound: With the VIZIO soundbar, you’ll enjoy a true1 surround sound that are backed with the subwoofer and rear satellite speakers.
  • Expansive Audio: It offers a 102 dB high-quality audio output which is more than enough for you to enjoy your favorite and thrilling movies.
  • Wireless Subwoofer and Rear Satellite Speakers: Both the subwoofer and the rear satellite speakers are wirelessly operated.
  • HDMI Connection: It also has an HDMI port where you can connect your devices and play your favorite music whenever you want.

Final Words

The VIZIO SB4051-CO Sound Bar System is the perfect solution to get rid of your thin television speakers. It has an average price and comes with a free-shipping offer at popular e-commerce stores around the world.

A Computer Monitors Guide

Computer monitors have a rich history, using technologies first invented in the late 1800s. CRTs (cathode ray tubes) were first used in the 1940s in television sets and, with advances and modifications, developed into the CRT computer monitors in use today. Development of newer types of video displays has led to a general changeover in preference from CRT monitors toward the LCD (liquid crystal display).

Cathode ray tube (CRT) computer monitors work by using an electron gun, or cathode, that fires electrons (cathode rays) through a vacuum tube within the monitor. By using magnetic fields, these rays are eventually translated into the appropriate colors on the display. Until recently, CRT computer monitors were the standard in home and business computer systems. However, because of the way CRT monitors work, they are extremely bulky and cumbersome. They consume much more power than cutting edge technologies like LCD. As a result, CRT computer monitors are no longer as popular as they once were.

Using a cathode, or electron gun, the CRT monitor functions by firing cathode rays (electrons) through the monitor’s vacuum tube. Magnetic fields transmit the electrons to the video display which translates them into the appropriate color. One drawback of the early CRT computer monitors was the curved screen, which distorted objects at the screen edge. This problem was eliminated with the manufacture of flat screen CRTs. Even with advances in technology, the CRT has obvious disadvantages when compared to an LCD. CRT computer monitors are prone to flickering or fading, because of what is called the refresh rate. The refresh rate refers to how many times the display is drawn per second. CRTs are also power-hungry, bulky and heavy.

The CRT has advantages and disadvantages. A CRT still renders color more accurately than an LCD. A user may use different screen resolutions on a CRT and not lose any video quality. CRTs are viewable from different angles. The disadvantages include the fact that CRTs are prone to flicker and fade, especially if they have a low refresh rate. The refresh rate is the rate per second that colors and displays are redrawn. The traditional CRT computer monitor is large, bulky and consumes much more power than an LCD computer monitor. Many CRTs have a curved screen, rendering the display distorted at the edges. Because they are no longer as popular, CRT computer monitors are getting more difficult to find.

Today’s LCD computer monitors offer genuinely improved performance. As a result, sales of CRTs have inevitably slowed. Because many view CRT computer monitors as outdated, manufacturers are no longer developing CRT monitor technologies as they once did.

Most modern computer manufacturers offer additional monitor accessories and options, along with energy saving features. USB ports, TV and video connection options are some of the integrated features available. Most monitors automatically power down or shut themselves off when not in use for a period. Several computer monitor manufacturers now offer “green” monitors that run more efficiently and use less power.

Settings available on most LCD monitors allow the user to adjust and customize the contrast, brightness, and color. LCD computer monitors are lightweight and offer easier portability than traditional monitors.

check out some of the monitors at Thin Bezel Monitor

Computer Monitors: An Overview

Computer monitors may all look the same on the outside, but they vary greatly on the inside. Contrast, clarity and overall image quality are the key things to consider. This article will introduce you to these concepts in more detail, and discuss some of the ideal specs.

Computer Monitors Basic Considerations

At one time, this discussion would have included an overview of the merits of cathode ray tube (CRT) monitors versus LCD. LCD monitors are now the norm so that argument has fallen by the wayside. In addition to the hard numbers about computer monitors, there are some other basic factors for businesspeople to consider.

Your Office Environment. Do you have a large window that causes a lot of glare on your screen? Is your office dark? Both of these questions will affect your decision on a monitor. To combat glare, you may need to angle your monitor, so you should find one that is adjustable. For dim lighting, be sure the monitor you choose has an adequate brightness How You Work. Do you frequently work with several applications at a time? If so, you may want a larger screen so you don’t have to constantly flip between active applications.

Just the Facts Computer Monitor Specifications

Here are some of the monitor specs you need to know about.

First, there is the response rate. Some tech experts call this number a marketing gimmick. In theory, lower response rates mean less distortion in a moving image. The rate itself is a measure of how long it takes a pixel to go from black to white and back again. While it is probably more important for users who watch a lot of video, this rating can indicate the quality of the image you will see. Cathode ray tube (CRT) computer monitors work by using an electron gun, or cathode, that fires electrons (cathode rays) through a vacuum tube within the monitor. By using magnetic fields, these rays are eventually translated in to the appropriate colors on the display. Until recently, CRT computer monitors were the standard in home and business computer systems. However, because of the way CRT monitors work, they are extremely bulky and heavy. They consume much more power than cutting edge technologies like LCD. As a result, CRT computer monitors are no longer as popular as they once were.

Using a cathode, or electron gun, the CRT monitor functions by firing cathode rays (electrons) through the monitor’s vacuum tube. Magnetic fields transmit the electrons to the video display which translates them into the appropriate color. One drawback of the early CRT computer monitors was the curved screen, which distorted objects at the screen edge. This problem was eliminated with the manufacture of flat screen CRTs. Even with advances in technology, the CRT has obvious disadvantages when compared to a LCD. CRT computer monitors are prone to flickering or fading, because of what is called the refresh rate. The refresh rate refers to how many times the display is drawn per second. CRTs are also power-hungry, bulky and heavy.

The CRT has advantages and disadvantages. A CRT still renders color more accurately than a LCD. A user may use different screen resolutions on a CRT and not lose any video quality. CRTs are viewable from different angles. The disadvantages include the fact that CRTs are prone to flicker and fade, especially if they have a low refresh rate. The refresh rate is the rate per second that colors and displays are redrawn. The traditional CRT computer monitor is large, bulky and consumes much more power than a LCD computer monitor. Many CRTs have a curved screen, rendering the display distorted at the edges. Because they are no longer as popular, CRT computer monitors are getting more difficult to find.

Today’s LCD computer monitors offer genuinely improved performance. As a result, sales of CRTs have inevitably slowed. Because many view CRT computer monitors as outdated, manufacturers are no longer developing CRT monitor technologies as they once did.

Most modern computer manufacturers offer additional monitor accessories and options, along with energy saving features. USB ports, TV and video connection options are some of the integrated features available. Most monitors automatically power down or shut themselves off when not in use for a period of time. Several computer monitor manufacturers now offer “green” monitors that run more efficiently and use less power.

Second, is the native resolution. Computer monitors can be adjusted for different resolutions, but the native resolution is the optimal one. Higher resolutions generally mean better image quality.

Third, is the brightness. Brightness ratings indicate how much light the monitor can generate. Brightness is also referred to as luminance. It is measured in candelas per square meter. Most experts will tell you that a rating of about 200-250 cd/m2 is best for work. Higher brightness ratings are okay too, but probably not necessary for a work environment.

Lastly, there is the contrast ratio. This number tells you how bright the whites are and how dark the blacks are. The higher the number, the better the contrast. It used to be that a contrast ratio of 800:1 or 1,000:1 was considered adequate and it still is – but now even low-priced computer monitors have specs of 5,000:1 or greater.

When shopping, keep in mind that many companies regularly upgrade their computer monitors when something new hits the market. As a result, there are great deals to be had on the secondary market.